Fr

28

Sep

2012

‎40 WILD DOGS KILLED IN NGORONGORO, TANZANIA

Ngorongoro district authorities are investigating the killing of more than 40 rare wild dogs in the controlled area of Loliondo Game reserve allegedly by people claiming that the animals killed 157 goats and 4 cows which belonged to them.

 

According to reports from the area, the people lit fires in the caves in which the dogs live along Kertalo and Orkiu villages near the Serengeti National Park border in the district. Reports from Loliondo said that the people are alleged to have put bundles of firewood inside the caves and set them on fire, after which they blocked the entrance to the caves with stones leaving the animals burning inside.

 

Ngorongoro District Commissioner Elius Wawa confirmed the incident saying that the investigation to establish the people behind the ruthless act was in progress.

“It is true, the incident has happened… the defense and security organs are currently investigating the matter,” Wawa said.

Speaking to journalists, the villagers said that a few days before being killed, the dogs invaded and killed 157 goats and four cows belonging to the villagers.

 

One of the villagers, Mbaaryo Papalai said the dogs have been a threat to their livestock and that whenever their animals were killed they were not compensated. “Personally I don’t know who killed these dogs …but whoever did it has helped us because these animals were a threat to us. They have eaten my 16 goats this year and I have not been compensated,” Papalai said. Another villager who resides at Kertalo, Mesiaya Ole Tome said that the government should investigate and come up with a strategy which would put an end to the killing of wild animals. “These killings are done by unknown people …I call upon the government to conduct an investigation which will involve speaking to the villagers so as to rescue the lives of these animals,” said Ole Tome. He said the wild dogs have been entering the residential areas in packs of ten to twenty and attacking their animals, thus creating fear among the villagers. There has been a spate of killings of the wild dogs since 2007 when 25 of them were killed by poison.

 

According to statistics Africa has 8000 wild dogs and Tanzania alone has 3,500 in different national parks in the country. According to Wildlife Conservation Society Tanzania website, Tanzania holds a critically important population of wild dogs, harbouring around 20% of the global population of the species, as well as the world’s second and third largest populations of the species in Selous and Ruaha ecosystems, 800 found in Sealous and 500 in Ruaha.

 

The world’s largest wild dog population is found in southern Africa spanning eastern Namibia, Botswana, western Zimbabwe, and southern Zambia and Angola.

SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN

See here all pictures from the wild dogs.

I was able two years ago photographed the first wild dogs after 20 years in the Serengeti. I called it a "once in a lifetime experience." I am shocked to read this news.

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Kommentare: 3
  • #3

    Uwe Skrzypczak (Mittwoch, 05 Dezember 2012 09:40)

    Thanks Uwe and Rajiv for the comments. The total animal welfare in Africa needs to be redeveloped, the people must finally be involved in the protection of animals and see a perspective of life in it. Read here my article http://www.serengeti-wildlife.com/serengeti-info/

  • #2

    Uwe Doornbos (Mittwoch, 05 Dezember 2012 00:49)

    Hello,
    No! This one goes even nich these rare animals for killing should go. Such skill and I would also not like to approve. These are one of the rarest animal kinds gives.
    One must protect these animals! Indeed, I do not know myself with this race from the cheetah there my field it is then still under prop I that these animals live!
    Nice greetings Uwe Doornbos

  • #1

    Rajiv Welikala (Mittwoch, 14 November 2012 09:28)

    This is such a sad situation,

    Authorities need to take steps to keep the dogs away from human habitats

    easier said than done though

    Regards

    Rajiv

    http://wildlifediaries.blogspot.com/