Mo

24

Nov

2014

Leopard family at the Talek River

Leopards are very rare to see in the wild, and leopard cubs even rarer. Found hiding in their hide-out at the Talek River, Masai Mara.

Photographing leopards in the wild requires great patience. Don’t be deceived by the many “action” photos shot in front of dusty or stony backgrounds that you can find on the Internet. These photos are mostly of tame leopards taken on farms in Namibia or South Africa. I am followed the mother until they identified where she was likely to have sheltered her babies. Although there was no view of the cubs, was “contact calling” – a very distinctive sound. I returned to that den site every day, and every day we would turn around and retreat after no sightings of the tiny animals.

leopards, babies, cubs, masai mara, kenya, wildlife, leopard

I had all pretty much lost hope of ever seeing the cubs, and even wondered if they were still alive. Then, one morning, as we were driving down the road towards one of the pans we found her. Boy were we excited about this discovery! We followed her for a few hundred meters until she finally came to a fallen tree and put the cub down.

leopards, babies, cubs, masai mara, kenya, wildlife, leopard
leopards, babies, cubs, masai mara, kenya, wildlife, leopard

It was with great joy and excitement that we got to witness this behaviour and to be a part of the discovery of another generation of leopards at Masai Mara.

(Photographed the super telephoto lens from #Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 800 mm 1:5,6E FL ED VR (since I work with both partner Nikon for my pictures and books).

leopards, babies, cubs, masai mara, kenya, wildlife, leopard

Tips for Leopard Photography

Photographing leopards in the wild requires great patience. Don’t be deceived by the many “action” photos shot in front of dusty or stony backgrounds that you can find on the Internet. These photos are mostly of tame leopards taken on farms in Namibia or South Africa.

 

Leopards not easy for the untrained eye to spot, whether in trees, in the bush, or in high grass. If you are inexperienced, or if your driver is not one of the best, you will have to leave it to luck to get your photo. Stay at least 300 yards from the spot, preferably under natural cover, and wait. Leopards are extremely strong.

They can drag their prey for long distances and hide it in high trees, even if it weighs signifi cantly more than their own body weight. Their greatest enemies are lions, which will kill any leopard they can get close to. Lions sometimes even surround a leopard’s tree until the leopard loses its nerve and descends to certain death. Leopards do not, as is sometimes reported, leap on their prey directly from trees, but first creep up as near as possible on the ground before making their fi nal attack. Leopards usually eat gazelles, impalas, and other similar, large ungulates and their young.

 

But they are adaptable and omnivorous, and will eat fi sh, domestic animals (especially dogs), and even the refuse that collects at the perimeters of is just as strong as a leopard and has canine teeth that are just as sharp. Sometimes, large groups of baboons turn the tables, and chase and kill leopards themselves.

 

When you are following and photographing leopards, especially at dusk, agree with your driver in advance on specific directional commands. “Over there in the bush” isn’t very helpful when all you can see is bushes and your view through the viewfi nder with a 500 mm or 600 mm lens is only a few degrees wide. Sometimes, large groups of baboons turn the tables, and chase and kill leopards themselves. When you are following and photographing leopards, especially at dusk, agree with your driver in advance on specific directional commands. “Over there in the bush” isn’t very helpful when all you can see is bushes and your view through the viewfinder with a 500 mm or 600 mm lens is only a few degrees wide.

 

By interest read more in my book "WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY" and read here my article for better pictures in Africa. 

All photos photographed in the Serengeti and the Masai Mara, by interest and more pictures see my new coffee table book SERENGETI

@ by Uwe Skrzypczak - www.serengeti-wildlife.com 

 

Check out my website for a listing of my 2015  AFRICAN BIG CAT PHOTO WORKSHOPS in the Masai Mara. Do not wait too long, my AFRICAN WILDLIFE PHOTO WORKSHOPS are up very quickly! 

MY BEST PHOTOS - NOW AS CALENDARS !

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Fr

14

Nov

2014

Cheetah cubs the Masai Mara - the last cheetahs in Kenya?

Cheetahs and the Maasai Mara hold a special place for me and this reflected in my pictures and my books. Cheetahs are officially listed as a vulnerable species, and their numbers are on the decline.  I am were therefore very excited to hear about the new Maasai Mara Cheetah Project launched by the Kenya Wildlife Trust http://kenyawildlifetrust.org 

He faced out, that the Masai Mara reserve has had one of the most stabile cheetah populations in Kenya with more than 60 individuals over the last decades, but now, they have an dramatically decline down to only 25 individuals. And in Masai Mara National reserve, no cheetah cub has survived over last two years. The Kenya Wildlife Trust’s Mara Cheetah Project aims to determine the status of Cheetah in the Mara and identify the major threats to the current population. This study will have important implications for cheetah conservation both in Kenya and in the rest of Africa and will be the foundation for a long-term research project of the highest calibre.

 

The cubs that survive start following their mother at around 6 weeks. They practice hunting though play with each other. After a year and a half, their mother leaves them to breed again. The cubs stay together until the females reach sexual maturity at around two years. At that point, other male cheetahs chase the male cubs off. But the male offspring often stay together for life, forming a group called a coalition. Coalitions are beneficial because they help male cheetahs gain territory.

 

These photos were made possible only with special permission, thanks my good friend James Sindiyo. Because, unfortunately, more and more tourists disturb the animals in the Masai Mara just because of the photos. Of the three babies, unfortunately, has survived only one babies .... well that's unfortunately the nature. I'm very proud of this family have watched so closely, and thus to show you these unique pictures to. 

Cheetah the Masai Mara, kenya

As animals built for speed, cheetahs have weak jaws and small teeth and are unable defend their young against lions, hyenas, jackals, birds of prey, and other predators. The cheetah may be a predator, but it is also preyed upon. A recent studies in Kenya and the Serengeti park in Tanzania show that 90 per cent of cubs die before reaching the age of three months. So a mother cheetah's maternal role is critical to the survival of the species, which has been considered endangered since the Sixties.

Cheetah cubs the Masai Mara, kenya
Cheetah cubs the Masai Mara, kenya
Cheetah cubs the Masai Mara

The global cheetah population is rapidly dwindling and with less than 10 000 individuals left in the wild, cheetahs are vulnerable to extinction. Unfortunately the remaining populations will continue to decline unless something is done.  To save the last cheetahs in Masai Mara please support "Maasai Mara Cheetah Project", Femke Broekhuis and Nelson Ole Keiwua by Facebook https://www.facebook.com/MaraCheetahProject.

All photos photographed in the Serengeti and the Masai Mara, by interest and more pictures see my new coffee table book SERENGETI

@ by Uwe Skrzypczak - www.serengeti-wildlife.com 

 

Check out my website for a listing of my 2015  AFRICAN BIG CAT PHOTO WORKSHOPS in the Masai Mara. Do not wait too long, my AFRICAN WILDLIFE PHOTO WORKSHOPS are up very quickly! 

MY BEST PHOTOS - NOW AS CALENDARS !

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Mo

03

Nov

2014

Rhinos - The Last of their Kind

Photographing rhinos (and especially black rhinos) in the wild is largely a matter of luck. What is it that makes these enormous beasts so fascinating? I think it is

simply their behavior, which is completely diff erent from that of almost all of the tired-looking specimens that we know from zoos around the world. Rhinos are

extremely timid, very cautious, and rare. Only a handful of the thousands of black rhinos that once populated East Africa survived the massed hunting and

poaching of late 20th century. The surviving animals were also seriously endangered until a young bull from the Serengeti joined the crater population, proving that the animals still follow long, thousand-yearold migratory routes in spite of the modern park borders. There are now about 60 black rhinos living in the wild in the Ngorongoro Crater and the rest of the Serengeti.

The rhinos were hunted and poached for their horns, which were (and unfortunately, still are) prized as dagger handles by Arab potentates and are ground to a powder that is supposed (predominantly in China) to enhance virility. The animals’ corpses were left to rot once the horns had been stolen and, even today, a single horn is worth 100 times the average East African annual wage. For this reason, the remaining animals are protected around the clock by park rangers.

Rhinos can be dangerous although, as Professor Grzimek proved, they often mount fake charges. Sometimes, even the people whose job it is to protect them have been fatally injured by rhinos charging at 25 mph. They have weak eyesight but can scent other animals over distances of many miles. 

A rhino mother with a calf in tow will stop every few yards and smell the air in all directions to make sure that her baby is not in danger from a predator.

In bright sunlight, and at any distance, you will need eagle eyes to be able to tell a dozing rhino from a weather-beaten termite mound. If you manage to

make out a rhino, you “only” need to fi nd a track that leads near enough to it to take a photo. Rhinos are mostly found in areas where off -road driving is prohibited. 

All photos photographed in the Serengeti and the Masai Mara, by interest and more pictures see my new coffee table book SERENGETI

@ by Uwe Skrzypczak - www.serengeti-wildlife.com 

 

Check out my website for a listing of my 2015  AFRICAN BIG CAT PHOTO WORKSHOPS in the Masai Mara. Do not wait too long, my AFRICAN WILDLIFE PHOTO WORKSHOPS are up very quickly! 

MY BEST PHOTOS - NOW AS CALENDARS !

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Mo

27

Okt

2014

Lion love: Father meets his cubs for the first time

Woah, Dad's a bit scary: Heartwarming footage of the moment a papa lion meets its baby cubs for the first time. The heart-warming first encounter shows six-month-old lins cubs in the Masai Mara, photographed by my last wildlife photography workshop.

 

Lions may be one of the world's deadliest predators - but this male quickly assumed the role of caring father when meeting his cubs for the first time.

The heart-warming first encounter shows six-month-old lions cubs. The lions babies full of youthful intrigue as they bound towards their dad hoping he wanted to play. And aware of his new role he was quick to ensure they knew who was boss - giving them a gentle roar if they overstepped the mark or a light pat with his paw to calm them down.

Hello, Dad … do you think!
Hello, Dad … do you think!
It's all OK dad.
It's all OK dad.
The proud father ...
The proud father ...
One day, little cubs, you will be able to roar like the father.
One day, little cubs, you will be able to roar like the father.

Capturing the tender father-and-son interaction was very rewarding for me, who spent a lot of time watching the lions over the course of weeks and months.

The father lion was very gentle with his cubs, who was rather skittish being around the tough older lion at first. "After a few days of being around Dad they realize he's not going to hurt them and the play becomes rougher, but even when play is rowdy, Dad looks at Mom!"

 

I hope these photos will inspire adults and children alike to care about wildlife and conservation efforts, so that future generations will have a chance to see these animals in the wild.

 

Africa will lose its wild lion population within the next 10 to 15 years unless something dramatic is done about the situation. In 50 years, Africa’s lion population has declined from 450.000 to 20.000, leopards have followed a similar curve from 700.000 to 50.000 and there are around 8.000 -10.000 cheetah left today. These figures represent a 95% decline in these predator populations.

 

Looking at these touching photos, it’s certainly hard to imagine a world without this father-and-son pair.

 

Check out my website for a listing of my 2015  AFRICAN BIG CAT PHOTO WORKSHOPS in the Masai Mara. Do not wait too long, my AFRICAN WILDLIFE PHOTO WORKSHOPS are up very quickly! 

 

MY BEST PHOTOS - NOW AS CALENDARS !

2 Kommentare

Di

01

Apr

2014

The cowndown runs - my new exhibition "Serengeti – a Wonder of Evolution"

11. April up to the 29. Juny 2014 the Natural History Museum Paderborn, Germany presents more than 60 of my pictures and collages in big size prints from 24 to 32 inches up to 40 to 120 inches on original ©Canson Museums-Canvas. 

 

Last year 20.000 people visited the exhibition in Bonn ... children with wondering eyes (the lions, cheetahs, wildebeest ... ) Photography can change the world. Conservation and photography go hand in hand!

The Natural History Museum Paderborn
The Natural History Museum Paderborn

Back from my wildlife photography workshop and the cowndown runs ... printing of the last big sizes picture on strong Canson Museums-Canvas and and monting of the pictures on galery-wrops. All pictures for the exhibition hand signed, 440 g Canson museums-canvas on gallery wraps.

The studio full up with the prints for my exhibition. All canvas pictures in time- and material-consuming handwork, from my good friends by BILDWERK (printed on an original photo canvas and professionally wrapped over a real wood stretcher).

I understand my work primarily as a conservationist and use my photography skills, my observations and conduct studies to document. In many of my pictures you can as a spectator, the special closeness and intensity that I feel to be developed during my years of working with wild animals in East Africa.

With my photographs and texts they want to contribute to the preservation of our natural heritage and inspire people about the beauty and uniqueness of the last remaining natural areas of the Earth.

 

During the exhibition, they had the opportunity to purchase my new book SERENGETI, Serengeti postcards and Serengeti posters. All handsigned!

 

I hope for many visitors in my new exhibition and would be happy about numerous suggestions and comments. 

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Do

14

Nov

2013

Africa’s Western black rhino officially declared extinct

Africa’s western black rhino is now officially extinct according the latest review of animals and plants by the world’s largest conservation network. The subspecies of the black rhino — which is classified as “critically endangered” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species — was last seen in western Africa in 2006. The IUCN warns that other rhinos could follow saying Africa’s northern white rhino is “teetering on the brink of extinction” while Asia’s Javan rhino is “making its last stand” due to continued poaching and lack of conservation. “In the case of the western black rhino and the northern white rhino the situation could have had very different results if the suggested conservation measures had been implemented,” Simon Stuart, chair of the IUCN species survival commission said in a statement. This update offers both good and bad news on the status of many species around the world. “These measures must be strengthened now, specifically managing habitats in order to improve performance, preventing other rhinos from fading into extinction,” Stuart added. The IUCN points to conservation efforts which have paid off for the southern white rhino subspecies which have seen populations rise from less than 100 at the end of the 19th century to an estimated wild population of 20,000 today ... read here the full article. 

 

Poaching and lack of conservation have made a subspecies of Africa's black rhino extinct - One quarter of mammals on IUCN Red List are at risk of extinction. What is the next lions, cheetahs, elephants????

The killing must stop. Blood Ivory can no longer be a badge of prosperity of wealth, the cost is far too high. The people that do not understand we all are part of a chain, with melting of the poles, change of climate, animals killed for profit , we and our children will pay dearly.

We WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHERS want contribute to the preservation of our natural heritage and inspire the people of the beauty and uniqueness of the last remaining natural areas of the earth ... so show the world about this article. 

New Big-Five Photo-Workshops & Photo-Safaris Kenya, March and May 2014. 

 

Read more and booking the Big-Five Photo-Workshops ... here!

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Do

02

Mai

2013

Elefanten in Tanzania in den nächsten sieben Jahren ausgestorben??

Des parlamentarischen Ausschusses für Land, Umwelt und natürliche Ressourcen Tanzania warnte gestern das die Elefantenpopulation im Land in den nächsten sieben Jahren aussterben könnte. Der Ausschussvorsitzende James Lembeli (Kahama-CCM) erklärte gestern in der Nationalversammlung für das Ministerium für Naturressourcen und Tourismus, dass die Rate der Elefant Wilderei alarmierende Ausmaße im Land in den letzten Jahren erreicht hat, und fragte dabei die Regierung "Es scheint als schliesse die Regierung die Augen vor dem Abschlachten der Elefanten".

Unter Berufung auf Forschungsergebnisse von Tansania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI) sagte Lembeli, dass die Zahl der Elefanten im Jahr 2009 unter 70.000 im vergangenen Jahr von 109.000 sich verringerte. "Vierundzwanzig Elefanten wurden innerhalb von 10 km in den letzten drei Monaten erschossen. Dreißig Meilen von hier sind weitere 26 Elefanten tot aufgefunden wurden. sagte Pratik Patel.

 

Safari-Tour Betreiber versuchen Alarm zu schlagen, "wenn wir nach Süden Tansania gehen ich kann Ihnen zeigen 70 Kadaver an einem Tag," sagte er, unter Bezugnahme auf die Selous, dem weltweit größten Game Reservat.".

 

"Elfenbein ist äußerst wertvoll und wie bei Diamanten, es ist wird nicht nur zur Finanzierung von Bürgerkriege und Stammes-Kriege innerhalb von Grenzen Afrikas verwendet, sondern auch durch terroristischen Organisationen. Blut-Elfenbein wird genutzt, um internationale Terroristen, einschließlich Al-Qaeda, Al Shaabab und Lord's Resistance Army zu finanzieren. 30.000 Elefanten - das ist die Anzahl der afrikanischen Elefanten, die im Jahr 2012 für ihre Stoßzähne. getötet wurden" (African Wildlife Trust).

 

 

Lesen Sie die gesamte Guardian-Geschichte hier +  Lese bei AP-Geschichte hier +  Lesen bei African Wildlife Trust Website hier

See the elephants from the Serengeti Mara Ecosystem in my new book SERENGETI and in my gallery

 

Read here all article from the animals  im Serengeti Mara Ecosystem!

 

We WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHERS want contribute to the preservation of our natural heritage and inspire the people of the beauty and uniqueness of the last remaining natural areas of the earth ... so show the world about this article. Share this and please leave a comment, thank you!


1 Kommentare

Fr

26

Apr

2013

What will we do when we sit in the African bush and not hear the lion roar?

The continent's lion population has shrunk by 75% in the past two decades, according to wildlife experts. They are currently "vulnerable" on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's list of threatened species. In west and central Africa lions are classified as "endangered".

 

Trophy hunting, human encroachment, poaching, lion poisoning, and human/lion conflict have become a grave concern. In Asia, lion bones have become a popular commodity for healing and traditional purposes. This is a huge concern as the market is increasing for lion bones... to make lion soup or lion wine. Its properties were believed... to provide medicinal remedies, which is medically unfounded.

 

The expanding agricultural sector has led to lions confining themselves to isolated areas, increasing their risk of extinction (read here my article from the Masai Mara). Every year more lions die as they are forced to make room for Africa's growth. In Botswana alone over 100 lions are killed each year in an attempt to protect livestock.

In South Africa around 1 500 lions are killed each year in the name of trophy hunting. By killing the dominant male in the pride... hunters set off a chain reaction of instinctive behaviours in which the subsequent dominant male kills all the offspring of the previous dominant male lion. It is estimated that six to eight feline deaths results from each dominant male that is shot. 165 US dollars paid for a Kilogram of Lion Bones to be exported to Laos and Vietnam. 1100 US for a Lion Skull to be exported. There has been reports of hunting outfitters digging up previously shot Lion Skeletons to sell the Bones. Read here the article

"Demand for lion bones offers South African breeders a lucrative return." 

 

According to Panthera, a wildcat conservation group, lions have vanished from over 80% of their historic range and are extinct in 26 countries. Only seven countries, Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe are believed to each contain more than 1 000 lions.

A lot more needs to be done to prevent the species' extinction.


Lions may be the well-reputed kings of the savannah, but South Africa's lucrative trophy-hunting industry means the regal cats are more likely to know the inside of a paddock ringed with an electric fence than the country's sweeping plains. To the dismay of animal rights activists and environmentalists, growing numbers of the top predator are being farmed for hunting, with more than half of South Africa's roughly 8 000 lions now in captivity. An estimated 3000 or so lions live wild in SA, compared to more than 5000 held in paddocks. Amateur trophy hunters - most of whom come from the US - each year kill about 500 captive-bred lions in SA. Hunters are ready to part with $22.000 per male lion, in addition to just about as much for other logistical and taxidermy costs. A lioness however comes in much cheaper at $4.000.

Kenya alone loses around 100 wild lions every year due to human contact. Experts believe there will be no more wild lions left in Kenya by 2030.

There is a scarcity of wild prey due to over-hunting by humans. When wild preys are over-hunted, lions are forced to feed on livestock. This drives further conflict with humans in which the lion ultimately loses. The lions are the most vital centre point in many ecosystems. If we lose them we can anticipate eventual collapse of whole environments, right down to the water systems, as prey shifts or migrations stop, and species overgraze and destroy the integrity of important vegetation, especially along rivers.

All species of tiger are now listed in CITES Appendix I, making illegal trade in them harder. That possibly is why lions are now being targeted. The African lion, Panthera leo, is listed in CITES Appendix II, a listing in Appendix I will not, unfortunately, eliminate all legal trade in lions. It will only serve to increase the regulations surrounding such trade. Trade will be more strictly controlled. In order to engage in trade of a species in Appendix I, there would have to be an export permit from the country of origin but also an import permit from the destination nation. This would be the first important step for me!

 

The lion is an important part of mankind's culture. The lion's existence is interwoven into the very fabric of African folklore and daily life and the iconic images of a lion stalking the savannah, the rasping echo of its roar and the bloodcurdling chill of the animal in full flight are sights and sounds that are, in every sense of the word, irreplaceable.

 

See the lions from the Serengeti Mara Ecosystem in my new book SERENGETI and in my gallery

We WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHERS want contribute to the preservation of our natural heritage and inspire the people of the beauty and uniqueness of the last remaining natural areas of the earth ... so show the world about this article. Share this and please leave a comment, thank you!


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Mo

18

Feb

2013

In tribute to elephant of the world

An iconic scene from East Africa – an elephants family in the foreground and the snow capped Mt. Kilimanjaro in the background. While the mountain is in Tanzania across the border, it can be viewed clearly from Amboseli, Kenya.

Elephants in Amboseli

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, regulates ivory trading. When elephant numbers were plummeting in the 1980s, CITES had a legal ivory quota system. That system had no restraining effect, because it facilitated easy laundering. Tanzania in the 1980s lost a staggering 236,000 elephants. Between 1974 and 1989, Kenya’s elephants fell from about 167,000 to 16,000, down 90 percent.

 

The only effort that has ever proved effective was the bitterly won ivory ban implemented by CITES in 1990. Ivory prices instantly collapsed. Elephant populations slowly increased. The ban worked.

But it lasted only until 1999. That year, CITES allowed Zimbabwe, Botswana and Namibia to sell 50 tons of stockpiled ivory to Japan, calling it a “one-time sale.” Then China wanted in. In a procedural sleight-of-hand, in 2008 the CITES secretariat let China bid on 102 tons of ivory from Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. (Another “one-time sale.”)

Immediately after China got its 2008 ivory pass, killing surged. In Kenya, for instance, fewer than 50 elephants were killed in 2007; this rocketed to about 250 in 2009 and just under 400 in 2012.

 

Permitting China to import ivory in 2008 opened the floodgates to laundering illegal tusks and stockpiling for more anticipated “one-time sales.” All this because some demand carvings that people could — literally — live without. CITES must re-institute a clear, unequivocal, permanent ban on ivory trading.

Tanzania — where some estimate 60 elephants are being killed daily — recently petitioned Cites for a “one-time sale” of stockpiled tusks. Tanzania further sought ongoing permission to sell tusks, hides, feet, ears, tails and — if any remain — live elephants. Following fierce protest, Tanzania in January withdrew its proposal. For now.

 

How many elephants are dying? If the 38 tons of tusks seized in 2011 represented 10 percent of illegal ivory, it translates to something over 40,000 elephants killed annually — an elephant every 15 minutes. Read here the article by NYTimes.

 

The killing must stop. Blood Ivory can no longer be a badge of prosperity of wealth, the cost is far too high. The only beings on the planet that truly need ivory are the elephants themselves.

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Fr

28

Sep

2012

‎40 WILD DOGS KILLED IN NGORONGORO, TANZANIA

Ngorongoro district authorities are investigating the killing of more than 40 rare wild dogs in the controlled area of Loliondo Game reserve allegedly by people claiming that the animals killed 157 goats and 4 cows which belonged to them.

 

According to reports from the area, the people lit fires in the caves in which the dogs live along Kertalo and Orkiu villages near the Serengeti National Park border in the district. Reports from Loliondo said that the people are alleged to have put bundles of firewood inside the caves and set them on fire, after which they blocked the entrance to the caves with stones leaving the animals burning inside.

 

Ngorongoro District Commissioner Elius Wawa confirmed the incident saying that the investigation to establish the people behind the ruthless act was in progress.

“It is true, the incident has happened… the defense and security organs are currently investigating the matter,” Wawa said.

Speaking to journalists, the villagers said that a few days before being killed, the dogs invaded and killed 157 goats and four cows belonging to the villagers.

 

One of the villagers, Mbaaryo Papalai said the dogs have been a threat to their livestock and that whenever their animals were killed they were not compensated. “Personally I don’t know who killed these dogs …but whoever did it has helped us because these animals were a threat to us. They have eaten my 16 goats this year and I have not been compensated,” Papalai said. Another villager who resides at Kertalo, Mesiaya Ole Tome said that the government should investigate and come up with a strategy which would put an end to the killing of wild animals. “These killings are done by unknown people …I call upon the government to conduct an investigation which will involve speaking to the villagers so as to rescue the lives of these animals,” said Ole Tome. He said the wild dogs have been entering the residential areas in packs of ten to twenty and attacking their animals, thus creating fear among the villagers. There has been a spate of killings of the wild dogs since 2007 when 25 of them were killed by poison.

 

According to statistics Africa has 8000 wild dogs and Tanzania alone has 3,500 in different national parks in the country. According to Wildlife Conservation Society Tanzania website, Tanzania holds a critically important population of wild dogs, harbouring around 20% of the global population of the species, as well as the world’s second and third largest populations of the species in Selous and Ruaha ecosystems, 800 found in Sealous and 500 in Ruaha.

 

The world’s largest wild dog population is found in southern Africa spanning eastern Namibia, Botswana, western Zimbabwe, and southern Zambia and Angola.

SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN

See here all pictures from the wild dogs.

I was able two years ago photographed the first wild dogs after 20 years in the Serengeti. I called it a "once in a lifetime experience." I am shocked to read this news.

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3 Kommentare

Mo

06

Aug

2012

Poachers now target lions for bones and body parts

Lion bones are increasingly important to the Asian traditional medicine trade, largely because the tigers that used to supply bones are facing dwindling numbers and trade in tiger parts is prohibited under international law. Juan de Beer of the Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency’s (MTPA) special investigations unit explained that before 2008 there was no market for lion bones. “Landowners are now digging up old bones that were buried and selling them,” he said.

 

Chris Mercer, director of the Campaign against Canned Hunting has said much more than just amplifying the trend, canned hunting is in fact setting the trend.

 

Lion bones opening up avenues for lion in the wild to be poached and their bones to be smuggled through the export supply chain undetected. 

 

Dr Pieter Kat, Director of Lion Aid a conservation organisation based in the United Kingdom, today a lion skeleton is worth $10 000 in the Asian countries, a rapid profit jump from $4 000 in 2010.

 

Lion bones and rhino horn have become key trade targets!!

 

South Africa has facilitated the following ... read here the article

• An export of 250kg of lion bones to Laos in 2009 (previous total 2000-2008 was 0);

• An export of 586 bones to Laos in 2010 (previous total 2000-2009 was 0);

• An export of 14 live lion to Vietnam in 2010 (previous total 2000-2009 was 2);

• An export of 29 skeletons to Laos and 19 to Vietnam in 2010 (previous total to Laos 2000-2009 was 5 and Vietnam was 0);

• An export of 90 teeth to Laos in 2010 (previous total to Laos 2000-2009 was 0)

• An export of 54 lion trophies to Laos (previous total to Laos 2000-2009 was 1). (Figures courtesy of Lion Aid, 2012)

 

 

Lion hunts in South Africa are worth more than 90 million dollar (£60 million) a year says the Professional Hunters Association. 16,394 foreign hunters (more than half of which fly from the US) killed 46,000+ animals from Sept. 2006 - Sept. 2007. Trophy hunter is worth $91.2 million a year and foreign tourist sometimes pay up to $40,000 to shoot a lion. The government supports hunting because of its revenue. Provincial government sell permits to kill rhinos, lions, elephants, and giraffes ... read and help LionAid http://www.lionaid.org/

 

We must work together to launch a worldwide campaign for African lions!

 

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2 Kommentare

Sa

28

Jul

2012

Animal Olympians

The Olympics is all about recognising and honouring - running,  jumping,  swimming,  diving and doing just about everything else.

Yet there are other games .... in the animal kingdom. For these wildlife athletes, speed, endurance and agility are a matter of life and death.

Read and see more about the animal olympians here ...  

cheetah, animals, wildlife, olympiade 2012, london, olympians

The fastest animal on the planet is the cheetah, which can run at speeds over 70 miles per hour. See all cheetah pictures here

Maneuverability, agility and climbing skills by young lion.

See here more pictures from the young lions.







Animals, Antilop, Serengeti, Africa

Concentration in the animal kingdom are sometimes very important.

Here is a fight between two topi bulls. Here all pictures.




zebras, africa, wildlife, olympiade, olympics, 2012

Very good endurance swimmers are zebras.

See here all pictures from the zebras.

Gazelles, animals, olympiade 2012, london, olympians,

The gazelles have greater endurance and agility in a high-speed chase as the cheetah’s. See here all pictures from the gazelles.

lions, Lions babys, africa, animals, olympiade 2012, london

Warming up and stretching in the animals world.

See here all pictures from the little lions.

Gnus, Wildebeest, Serengeti, olympiade 2012, london

The champions of triathlon in the animal kingdom, the wildebeest.

Wildebeest put in your walks throughthe Serengeti back more than 20 kilometers per day. See here all pictures.

elephants, wildlife, africa, london, Olympia 2012, olympics

The medal for WEIGHT LIFTING for the elephants in Africa. No land animal on Earth can lift as much weight as the African elephant, which can pick up a one-tonne weight with its trunk. See here more pictures from elephants.


 Welcome to the Animal Olympics!

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Mi

18

Jul

2012

Verlängerung meiner Serengeti Ausstellung

Serengeti Ausstellung "Serengeti ein Wunder der Evolution"

Meine Serengeti Ausstellung "Serengeti – ein Wunder der Evolution" wird aufgrund des grossen Interesse bis

zum 12. August 2012 im Zoologisches Museum Alexander Koenig in Bonn verlängert.


Über 60 meiner Fotos und Collagen in Großformaten von 60 x 80 cm bis zu 100 x 300 cm auf original ©Canson Museumsleinen sind zu sehen.

Öffnungszeiten des Museums: Dienstag bis Sonntag 10.00 bis 18.00 Mittwochs bis 21.00 Uhr. Montags geschlossen.


Alle News, Fotos, Presseartikel zu meiner Serengeti Ausstellung finden Sie hier.

Beim Besuch meiner Serengeti Ausstellung haben Sie auch die Möglichkeit meine neuen SERENGETI POSTKARTEN, den AUSSTELLUNGSKATALOG und SERENGETI POSTER im Museumsshop zu erwerben.

Vielen vielen Dank sage ich an die bisherigen vielen Besucher meiner Ausstellung, schreiben Sie mir doch gerne wie Ihnen die Ausstellung gefallen hat.

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Sa

14

Jul

2012

Photographing Hunting Lions

Lions often act quickly and without warning, so you need to be highly alert when photographing their hunting patterns. Lions need the advantage of surprise because their prey is often just as fast as (if not faster than) the lions themselves. Lions, like all big cats, are opportunists. If they have the chance to surprise potential prey, they will hunt during the day too. A lion dozing in the shade can be at full speed on the tail of a potential meal within seconds. Lions, especially the more agile lionesses, often hunt alone, although I have witnessed two group hunts in the Ngorongoro Crater.

When you find your target pride, use your binoculars or telephoto lens to determine whether their manes, necks, and mouths show signs of blood, and whether their bellies appear full. If this is the case, the lions have most likely hunted successfully during the night and won’t be on the move again too soon -unless, of course, they didn’t kill enough to feed the whole group. If you fi nd a group without signs of a hunt, or which is on the lookout, or which is already targeting its prey (like the group in the photo), you should initially keep suffi cient distance to retain an overview of the situation. The next step is to search the area for the lions’ potential prey.

Pride of lions targeting its prey

Pride of lions targeting its prey

Your driver should only set off once a lion begins to creep up on its prey, allowing you to get an idea of where the chase is headed. Try to get into the best possible position on the available tracks. If you can’t tell where your subject is headed, use a shorter focal length lens so that you don’t end up cropping the frame unintentionally. In spite of the less than perfect perspective, you should always photograph chase scenes from the sunroof of your vehicle so that you can maximize your pan range. Set your motor drive to its highest speed and make sure you have enough free capacity on your memory card. Then select the shortest possible shutter speed that won’t produce excess image noise and keep your subject in permanent view in the viewfinder. The attack itself will happen quickly and only lasts a few seconds. A lion can accelerate extremely rapidly to speeds of nearly 40 mph, but can only run at maximum speed for about 250 yards. Always pan the camera in the direction the lion is running, as even the shortest shutter speeds cannot freeze this type of action head-on. You should also continually check focus.

Young lioness chasing a gnu

Successful wildlife photography also depends on sticking with the subject, even when the action gets brutal or bloody. Once you have the chase scene in the bag, photograph the rest of the action to complete the story. The story shown here illustrates a lioness teaching her one-year-old cub to hunt. The cub’s paws are already strong enough, but its mouth is still too small to kill the gnu eff ectively with a single bite. Lions usually kill using a suff ocating bite to the neck and confi rm the kill with a second bite to the mouth. Big cats generally only eat if they are sure their prey is dead. The kill usually takes a few minutes, but this gnu was only playing dead and kept restarting the fight every time the lions wanted to eat. The young lion’s attempts at the kill went on for over an hour until the gnu was finally killed by an older lioness.

Young lion attempting a kill

Single-area AF autofocus with manual focus area selection is always the safest solution for photos like these. This is especially true when you are shooting under cloudy skies, as you will need to use wide apertures and shallow depth of field to produce the short shutter speeds and low ISO values necessary for noise-free images.

Young lion

Young lion grappling with a gnu

The bloodied young lions look like something out of a horror movie by the time they have finished their meal. Scenes like these can cause more sensitive people to feel nauseous or to have nightmares, but they are nevertheless part of everyday reality in the wild.

Young lions with their prey

Young lions with their prey

Photography is a lifelong "learning by doing" process, read my book "Wildlife Photography"  and learn! 

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Sa

07

Jul

2012

Cheetahs in Kenya on the brick of extinct?

Gestern erhielt ich eine Brief von meinem Freund James Sindiyo, dem Chef der Parkranger in der Massai-Mara in Kenia. Er zeigte auf, dass die mit mehr als 60 Tieren seit Jahrzehnten stabilste Gepardenpopulation Kenias in der Massai-Mara dramatisch zurückgegangen ist. Die neuste Zählung weist nur noch 25 Tiere aus und kein Gepardenjunges hat in den letzten zwei Jahren überlebt.

James Sindiyo und sein Freund Dr. Erustus Kania vom Kenya Wildlife Service koordinieren jetzt ein neues Naturschutzprojekt um die letzten überlebenden Geparden der Massai-Mara zu erhalten www.masaimaracheetahs.org Bitte unterstützt die Arbeit von James und Erustus!

 

Yesterday i received a letter from my friend James Sindiyo, Chief Game Warden of the Masai Mara National reserve in Kenya.

He faced out, that the Masai Mara Reserve has had one of the most stabile cheetah populations in Kenya with more than 60 individuals over the last decades, but now, they have a dramatically decline down to only 25 individuals.

And in the Reserve, no cheetah cub has survived over last two years.

To save the last cheetahs in Masai Mara, James and his friend Dr. Erustus Kanga from Kenya Wildlife Service are coordinating a Cheetah Conservation Project in Masai Mara Reserve: www.masaimaracheetahs.org Please support James and Erustus work!

 

                                                                                   »» The last cheetahs in Kenya? ««

     

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Pictures from the Serengeti Mara Ecosystem

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